New York Style Chocolate Cheesecake – less carbs than a slice of bread

Some people think of Dietitians as the healthcare professional that is going to take all the fun out of life. We’re going to advise you to eat carrots, when everyone else is eating cheesecake. That is not how I practice. Even when I taught a higher carb style of eating, I always believed there were “everyday foods” and “sometimes foods” and never believed in forbidding any food (unless serious food allergies were involved). For me it’s always been about how much and how often we eat something.

If you’ve been following my blogs for a while, you know that I don’t believe in eating unlimited amounts of any type of foods or restricting any food groups. Yes, I recommend people eat carbs in vegetables, nuts and seeds, certain dairy and some fruit. Protein is adequate, but not in excess because excess protein will go to the liver and synthesize glucose which would otherwise been made from our fat stores.  I encourage eating a wide range of healthy fat, including that found in the protein sources, as well as monounsaturated fats such as olive oil and avocado oil, as well as using coconut oil to raise the smoke point of those, when heating them to higher temperatures.

But what about sweets? Where do they fit in?

I do think there are times where celebrating a special occasion warrants making something special that contains carbs, fat and protein beyond what we usually eat.  I am not the Grinch of holidays or celebrations!

I encourage people to plan for eating the treats by knowing the  macronutrient content in it (amount of protein, fat and carbs in grams) and subtracting that from their Meal Plan ahead of time.  This rarely necessitates people eating more than they usually do because the foods themselves, if well planned, can take the place of a meal. If it means that someone eats “Pumpkin Pie without the Pie” (crust-less low carb pumpkin custard) instead of supper, so be it!  The net carbs from the pumpkin itself minus the fiber aren’t that high, and the eggs and cream inside the custard filling serve as the protein source for the meal, and the rest is fat.  So? What’s wrong with that?

Tonight is one of those occasions that a special treat was warranted. One of my sons has been wanting New York style cheesecake since he began eating low carb high healthy fat with me, 7 months ago and today I baked him one!  It is creamy and rich with all the mouth-feel one expects from New York Cheesecake from the cream cheese, egg and egg yolks.  It has real Swiss dark chocolate and homemade vanilla extract, made from real vanilla beans soaked in Russian vodka. It has a little hint of sweet, because after all, it is for a special occasion!  Should he choose to (or rather if he were even able to) he could eat the entire 8 1/2″ cheese cake and not exceed his daily 100 g of carbs!  I can assure you, he will try! And who could blame him?

Low Carb New York Style Cheesecake

Ingredients

  • Five 250 g (8 oz) pkgs cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup of berry sugar (extra fine castor sugar)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp real vanilla
  • 5 lg eggs plus two egg yolks, room temperature
  • 100 gm (3.5 oz.) 85% cocoa Swiss dark chocolate, melted in a double boiler

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 500 F.

Prepare an 8 1/2 ” spring-form pan by lining with parchment paper and spraying well with an oil spray.

 

In the bowl of a stand mixer using the flat paddle or by hand, beat the cream cheese until very well blended and add the eggs one at a time, continuing to blend.  Add the egg yolks, then the salt, berry sugar (castor sugar) and real vanilla.

Remove the bowl from the stand mixer and fold in the melted, cooled chocolate.

 

Bake at 500 F for 12 minutes, then lower the heat to 200 F and make for another 45 minutes.

Turn off the heat of the oven and open the door, but leave the cheesecake inside for 30 minutes until partially cooled.

Then move it to a draught-free location to completely cool.

Enjoy!


Based on 1/12 of the cheesecake, the macronutrient content is as follows;

  • Carbohydrates: 12.6 g*
  • Protein: 17 g
  • Fat: 46 g

* a slice of bread has 15 g of carbs

Turkey or Chicken Low Carb Lasagne – great for leftovers

It’s the day after Canadian Thanksgiving and many people are wondering what to do with leftover turkey.  Well, here’s an almost no-carb idea for a delicious LCHF Lasagne! It can also be made with sliced cooked BBQ chicken breast, as well.

Almost no-carb turkey or chicken lasagne

INSTRUCTIONS

Grease an 8″ x 10″ ceramic or glass baking dish liberally with butter or a high quality fat of your choice.

In a bowl, place 500 ml (2 cups) plain tomato sauce and season with salt, freshly ground black pepper, fresh squeezed garlic, rubbed oregano and extra virgin olive oil and set aside.

In another bowl, beat 3 eggs and add enough whipping cream to bring the volume up to 500 ml (2 cups).  Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper and add 100 gm (3 oz) grated Parmesan (or Asiago) cheese. Grate a bit of fresh nutmeg into the mixture, and set aside.

In the microwave, cook 2 pkg. of chopped, frozen spinach until defrosted, but not cooked.  Place in a sieve and press out water with the back of a large spoon.  With clean hands or a cheesecloth (if you prefer), squeeze out the excess water and leave in sieve while preparing the rest of the ingredients.  In a small bowl, beat 3 eggs and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste and then add the well-drained spinach.  Add a touch of whipping cream to increase volume / adjust texture, if desired.

Slice the turkey or chicken breast to 3 mm slices (not to thin as it won’t have the correct texture when baked).

Now you are ready to assemble the lasagne, but while you are doing that, preheat the oven to 450° F.

In the bottom of the greased baking dish, layer 1/2 the tomato sauce mixture.  Add one layer of sliced turkey (or chicken) – about 1/3 of the total quantity, being sure to leave no gaps between pieces.  Spread the sliced poultry with a layer of the spinach mixture and top that with 1/2 the cream mixture. Add the second layer of poultry and on top of that, spread the rest of the spinach mixture and top that with the remainder of the cream mixture.  Finish with the remainder of the sliced poultry and top with the rest of the seasoned tomato sauce and cover the top well with shredded Parmesan cheese, or a mixture of Parmesan or Asiago cheese mixed with shredded mozzarella.

Bake at 450° F until bubbly and hot and slightly browned on top.

Enjoy!

ACV Gingeraid Recipe with Variations – food as medicine

In both a recent A Dietitian’s Journey entry (Food as Medicine – dramatically lower blood sugar) and an academic article (Food as Medicine to Lower Blood Glucose – scientific support), I discussed the use of- and scientific basis for consuming beverages containing apple cider vinegar, ginger, turmeric root, and kombucha in lowering blood sugar levels.  In this post, I provide the recipe for “ACV Gingeraid” along with the different variations mentioned in the above-mentioned articles.

These beverages are most effective in lowering blood glucose when drunk immediately after a meal containing carbohydrates and nightly, before bed.

NOTE: Given the possibility of these ordinary foods resulting in a dramatic drop in blood sugar, if you are taking any medication, especially for controlling high blood sugar, check with your doctor before adding any of these foods to your diet.

ACV Gingeraid – basic recipe

1 litre water, carbonated (or use Club Soda/Seltzer) 
2 tsp apple cider vinegar, unpasteurized, unfiltered
1 tsp ginger root, washed, peeled, freshly grated

In a 1 litre of carbonated water (Club Soda/Seltzer), add 2 tsp of unpasteurized, unfiltered apple cider vinegar such as Braggs®. Allen’s® also makes one, but read the labels carefully, as their regular apple cider vinegar is pasteurized and hence does not contain the “mother”, or culture. Using a very fine grater, grate a 1″ x 1″ knob of washed and peeled ginger root and add it to the acidulated water. Cover tightly and chill if desired, before drinking or drink at room temperature.


Turmeric ACV Gingeraid

 1 litre water, carbonated (or use Club Soda/Seltzer) 
2 tsp apple cider vinegar, unpasteurized, unfiltered
1 tsp ginger root, washed, peeled, freshly grated
1/2 tsp turmeric root, peeled, freshly grated
1/8 tsp black pepper corns, freshly ground

In a 1 litre of carbonated water (Club Soda/Seltzer), add 2 tsp of unpasteurized, unfiltered apple cider vinegar such as Braggs® or  Allen’s® unpasteurized. Using a very fine grater, grate a 1″ x 1″ knob of washed and peeled ginger root and add it to the acidulated water. Using a polyethylene kitchen glove or plastic sandwich bag on the hand holding the turmeric root, on the same grater, grate a 1/2″ by 1/2″ piece of turmeric root and add it to the Gingeraid. Add a few grindings of freshly ground black pepper (increases bioavailability of turmeric, due to it containing piperine). Cover tightly and chill if desired, before drinking or drink at room temperature.


Kombucha – ACV Gingeraid

1/2 litre water, carbonated (or use Club Soda/Seltzer) 
1/2 liter Kombucha
2 tsp apple cider vinegar, unpasteurized, unfiltered
1 tsp ginger root, washed, peeled, freshly grated
In a 1 litre bottle suitable for carbonated drinks, add the carbonated water (Club Soda/Seltzer) and Kombucha (any flavour). Be sure to choose brands with as few carbohydrates as possible, or brew your own using a low sugar recipe.
To this mixture, add 2 tsp of unpasteurized, unfiltered apple cider vinegar such as Braggs® or  Allen’s® unpasteurized.
Using a very fine grater, grate a 1″ x 1″ knob of washed and peeled ginger root and add it to the acidulated water.
Cover tightly and chill if desired, before drinking or drink at room temperature.
By changing the fruit that the second fermentation of Kombucha is made with, the flavour changes substantially.  The fructose in the fruit is largely consumed by the acetic acid bacteria during the second fermentation.

Turmeric Kombucha – ACV Gingeraid

1/2 litre water, carbonated (or use Club Soda/Seltzer) 
1/2 liter Kombucha
2 tsp apple cider vinegar, unpasteurized, unfiltered
1 tsp ginger root, washed, peeled, freshly grated
1/2 tsp turmeric root, peeled, freshly grated
1/8 tsp black pepper corns, freshly ground
In a 1 litre bottle suitable for carbonated drinks, add the carbonated water (Club Soda/Seltzer) and Kombucha (any flavour). Be sure to choose brands with as few carbohydrates as possible, or brew your own using a low sugar recipe.
To this mixture, add 2 tsp of unpasteurized, unfiltered apple cider vinegar such as Braggs® or  Allen’s® unpasteurized.
Using a very fine grater, grate a 1″ x 1″ knob of washed and peeled ginger root and add it to the acidulated water. Using a polyethylene kitchen glove or plastic sandwich bag on the hand holding the turmeric root, on the same grater, grate a 1/2″ by 1/2″ piece of turmeric root and add it to the Gingeraid. Add a few grindings of freshly ground black pepper (for the piperine, see above)
Cover tightly and chill if desired, before drinking or drink at room temperature.
Enjoy!

Copyright ©2017 The LCHF-Dietitian (a division of BetterByDesign Nutrition Ltd.) 

LEGAL NOTICE: The contents of this blog, including text, images and cited statistics as well as all other material contained here (the “content”) are for information purposes only.  The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, medical diagnosis and/or treatment and is not suitable for self-administration without the knowledge of your physician and regular monitoring by your physician. Do not disregard medical advice and always consult your physician with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or before implementing anything  you have read or heard in our content.

Bullet-less Low Carb Cappuccino and Latte

Okay, so it is Monday morning and a double or triple espresso cappuccino or latte is what you want, but not with all the carbs in the foamed milk.

Since weight-loss is one of your goals, and you know from reading an earlier article on leptin differences in overweight versus lean people that drinking “bulletproof coffee is not the best way to go, is there an alternative?

Yes there is!

I call it “Bullet-less Cappuccino“.

Bullet-less cappuccino

Bullet-less cappuccino (or latte) is made the same way as a regular cappuccino or latte, except instead of foaming milk (which has 12 carbs per cup!), I use 1/2 oz of heavy (whipping) cream diluted with 2 oz of ice cold filtered water. The ratio of cream to water can be changed to suit your taste and the amount of foam you want, and the total volume made can be adjusted depending on whether you want cappuccino or latte – but the good news is that regardless, the result is carb-free!

Since my diet naturally contains ~ 75% healthy fat and I was quite overweight before (obese, actually), I keep the amount of cream used low, so I don’t need to add much extra fat outside of those found naturally in the foods I eat.

This drink is very satisfying and is a great way to start an intermittent fast day. Yes, you can drink this while fasting as it does not cause an insulin release, because it is carb-free.

Whether you make it yourself, as I do or ask the barista at your favourite coffee house to make it for you…enjoy!

Be sure to read this new article about how starting your day with coffee has been found to boost nutritional ketosis. A summary of the study and results here: http://www.lchf-rd.com/2017/08/21/caffeine-substantially-increases-plasma-ketones-in-healthy-adults/


Note: Everyone's results following a LCHF lifestyle will differ as there is no one-size-fits-all approach and everybody's nutritional needs and health status is different. If you want to adopt this kind of lifestyle, please discuss it with your doctor, first.

Copyright ©2017 The LCHF-Dietitian (a division of BetterByDesign Nutrition Ltd.) 

LEGAL NOTICE: The contents of this blog, including text, images and cited statistics as well as all other material contained here (the “content”) are for information purposes only.  The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, medical diagnosis and/or treatment and is not suitable for self-administration without the knowledge of your physician and regular monitoring by your physician. Do not disregard medical advice and always consult your physician with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or before implementing anything  you have read or heard in our content.

LCHF Thai Green Curry (Vegetarian friendly)

For most people on a traditional low-fat “diet”, a Thai green curry is definitely ‘out’ – considered to have “way too much fat” in the coconut milk, not to mention in the deep fried poultry (or in this case, tofu)!  But for those eating Low Carb High Fat, the fragrant aroma of the galanga root and kaffir lime peel in the Green Curry Paste beckon.

Thai Green Curry is a meal of contrasts, with the crunchy bitterness of miniature Thai eggplants, the gentle bite of zucchini cubes or golf-ball size green Thai makhuea eggplants, short pieces of long beans or Western green beans and an abundance of tender anise-like leaves of Haropha basil.

What’s not to love about the natural creamy sweetness of pure coconut milk offset beautifully by the salty pungency of Thai Nam Pla (fish sauce)?

Whether one adds pieces of deep fried tofu or an abundance of cut up boneless chicken or duck, Thai Green Curry can be a meal in itself.

Green Thai Curry

If it is felt that Thai food must be served over rice, then why not make white cauliflower ‘rice’? It’s so easy and only 5 carbs per 1/2 cup (125 ml).

Cauliflower “Rice”

Cauliflower “Rice”

All there is to making Cauliflower “Rice” is to microwave finely chopped raw cauliflower with a tablespoon of water for 3 minutes covered at power level 10 (100%).  Then, let it stand covered for another 3 minutes, and voila!

When it is made from fresh compact heads of cauliflower, it has virtually no taste of its own and no smell!  Cooked as above, it is surprisingly hard to distinguish from the carb-laden original.

LCHF Thai Green Curry

Thai Green Curry can be made using any fresh vegetables you have on hand, or you can be a purist and shop at a South Asian market for a variety or traditional ones.

I usually use one or two varieties of Thai eggplant, long beans and when available, fresh miniature ears of corn (a mere 2.5 grams of carbs in an ounce (30 gm)).

Here is a basic recipe and cooking method;

  • 2-3 bunches Thai miniature green eggplant, taken off stem
  • 1/2 lb (250 gm) Thai round (golf-ball size) green eggplant
  • 1 bunch of long beans (1/2 lb / 250 gm) or equal quantity of green beans, cut in 1″ (3 cm) pieces
  • 1 medium size green zucchini, cut in 1/2 ” (1.5 cm) cubes
  • 1-2 bunches of Thai basil, washed and taken off stem
  • 1 package of deep fried tofu* (or 1 lb of chicken or duck thighs, marinated in a mixture of Thai green curry paste (1 Tbsp), 1 Tbsp Thai fish sauce, 2 Tbsp Thai coconut milk (100% pure).
  • coconut oil
  • Thai Green curry paste (available in jars at most supermarkets)
  • 250 ml of 100% pure coconut milk (boxed is preferable)
*some people avoid tofu due to its naturally containing phytoestrogens and goitrogens.  Then again, there are LCHF paleo-adherents that avoid most vegetables due to the compounds they naturally contain, such as phytates, oxylates and trypsin inhibitors which can bind minerals such as calcium and iron.  I think the nutrient benefits of non-starchy vegetables, their fiber content as well as their anti-oxidant properties are well learning what foods they shouldn't be paired with, to avoid an anti-nutrient effect.

Heat a heavy cast iron saucepan, frypan or wok.  Add the coconut oil and heat.  Spoon in a heaping tablespoon of Thai Green Curry Paste (less, if you don’t want it spicy!) and splash in 1 teaspoon of fish sauce (or to taste).

If using poultry, add it at this point and stir fry it until 80% cooked. Then add the vegetables beginning with the most dense, first.  (I start with the miniature eggplants and then the long beans or green beans, along with the larger Thai eggplants).  Toss them around in the fragrant seasoned oil until the vegetables begin to cook.  Then add about 1/2 of the coconut milk and turn the heat down to medium and cover. When the veggies are ~ 80% cooked, add in the more tender vegetables such as zucchini cubes and if serving with Cauliflower “Rice”, add the rest of the coconut milk. If serving alone, I don’t add more coconut milk, because there’s nothing to absorb it when serving.  Cover, and let the zucchini cook slightly.

It's important not to overcook the curry.  The vegetables should be "just" cooked and still slightly crunchy. If cooking Cauliflower "Rice", have it ready to go and cook it right at this point. Cooking it too far in advance will result in it having a strong cabbage-like smell.

Toss the basil leaves into the curry and serve immediately.

Enjoy!

 


Nutritional Info: The only carbs in this dish are 5 gms of carbs for every 1/2 cup serving of vegetables and 6 gms of (net) carbs for 3 oz (100 gm) of tofu.  If using poultry, then there aren’t any carbs. A half cup of 100% pure coconut milk has only 2 gm of carbs.

Low Carb Chow Mein

This recipe was made on the spur of the moment, when I felt like the taste and texture of Chow Mein, but without all the empty carbs of wheat or rice-based noodles.

I found a package of Bean Curd Strips at the local Chinese grocery store and since they had almost no carbs in them, I decided I would see how they would “sub” for noodles.  They were amazing!

They were chewy and crispy – with almost no discernible taste of their own.

Bean Curd Strips

I prepared them exactly as I would for real Chow Mein.

I plunged them into boiling water for a minute and tossed them around so they softened, then lifted them out and placed them into a colander to drain and shocked them with ice water.

I quickly blanched some cut up Chinese Broccoli (Gai Lohn) and sliced baby carrot in the same hot water, to save cooking time, later.

Then I heated a non-stick skillet on medium hot, added some coconut oil and fried the blanched Bean Curd Strips gently until golden and crispy on the bottom.  I flipped the whole mass over and continued frying them on the other side, while gently grinding Himalayan Pink Salt on the top.

I happened to have a defrosted boneless duck breast on hand, so I cut it in strips and marinated it in a mixture of real soy sauce, a bit of Chinese cooking wine and a splash of sesame oil.

I heated up a wok, added some coconut oil and about a tablespoon of diced fresh garlic then stir-fried the duck breast until almost cooked, and set aside.  In the same wok, I added a bit more oil, a bit more garlic, then added in the blanched veggies and some sliced zucchini and snap peas that I had on hand, to round out the colour and texture, then added back the almost-cooked duck breast. I poured in a little bit of chicken stock and then when the whole thing was cooked, thickened it with the tiniest amount of tapioca starch and water – just to give the sauce some body.  If I wasn’t a purist, I could have added butter to bind it, as the French would do.

Any meat could substitute, as would any vegetable of your choosing. The focus, after all was the noodlesand they did not disappoint!


You can follow me at:

 https://twitter.com/joykiddieRD

  https://www.facebook.com/lchfRD/

Low Carb Beer Batter Fish

I have been asked so many times for this recipe, that I’ve decided to post it and while this isn’t everyday fare for me, one of my sons would eat it as often as I would make it. There is a local fish and chips place right on the Pacific Ocean and I’ve been told this easily rivals theirs.

Have a look:

Low Carb Beer Batter Fish

The batter is light and crispy – like the best tempura batter.

In fact, when I make fish this way, I dip slices of zucchini in the leftover batter, and make a deep fried side to go with it. I mean, why not?  Once you’re frying, might as well, right?

Low Carb Beer Batter Fish and Zucchini

I fry in cold-expressed virgin coconut oil, as it has a high smoke point and unlike commercial refined seed oils like grapeseed, soybean, sunflower,  safflower  and corn oil, cold-expressed virgin coconut oil doesn’t produce Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), which cause oxidative damage to cells in the body.

I heat the coconut oil to between 160-170 °C or 320-340 °F, which is hot enough that a piece of batter dipped vegetable begins to puff and get golden quickly, but still allows some frying time for the internal parts to be fully cooked.

My favorite fish to fry this way is fresh Pacific Cod loins, but even defrosted Haddock Loins come out pretty good, if defrosted in the fridge until ~80% thawed, then pressed dry with a paper towel prior to dipping in batter, to get the excess water out.

Okay, enough background…here’s the recipe:

Low Carb Fish and Vegetable Beer Batter
  • 11 Tbsp unflavoured Whey Protein Isolate powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp pink Himalayan salt, ground
  • 1 tsp guar gum (or xanthan gum)
  • 3 eggs, large, free-range, beaten well
  • 3 Tbsp low carb beer (such as Sleeman Clear 2.0) or sparkling water (Club Soda, Seltzer)
Cooking Instructions
  1. Slice 6 cod or haddock loins in half and pat dry well with a paper towel.
  2. Cut one or two firm slender zucchini into 1/8″ (1/3 cm) slices.
  3. Heat the coconut oil in a heavy pot until between 320-340 °F. (160-170 °C).  Make sure there it is deep enough that the thickest piece of battered fish can float.
  4. Mix all the batter ingredients together in a wide, shallow bowl and whisk well for a minute or two, to make sure there are no lumps. (You can’t toughen the batter, as there is no gluten!)  The batter should be a light creamy yellow.
  5. When the coconut oil is hot enough, dip your zucchini (and/or other vegetables) and fry first on one side and then the other and set aside on a plate lined with several paper lunch bags, to absorb the excess fat. Don’t over cook.Be sure to whisk your batter back together for 20 seconds or so before dipping the fish to ensure the perfect consistency.
  6. Dip your dried, cut fish loins in the batter and coat well on both sides, and fry in the coconut oil until the batter is golden brown on the first side. Flip each piece over gently and fry on the second side, until the fish is cooked in the middle and a golden and crisp.*Don’t overcrowd the pot, as it will cause the oil temperature to decrease to much, and your fish will be greasy. I fry two pieces at a time in a 10″ (25 cm) pot.
  7. Transfer each piece to a plate lined with paper lunch bags, to absorb the excess oil.

    Enjoy!

Low Carb / Keto Ice Cream

The last few days have been rather hot and humid out and one of my young adult sons wanted ice cream.  Since we both eat low-carb now, this necessitated me inventing a low carb ice cream. Not having an ice cream maker, I tapped into my years of cooking experience for the “how to”. The two flavors I made were both were delicious and super easy to make. 

Carb Content

Japanese Black Sesame Keto Ice Cream

The Japanese Black Sesame Keto Ice Cream had only 3.5 gms of carbs per serving (2 1/2 grams of carbs per serving from the touch of date syrup as sweetener and 1 gm of carbs from the 20 gms of Black Sesame Paste. The only other ingredient was whipping cream (no carbs!).

Keto Coffee Chip Ice Cream

The Keto Coffee Chip Ice Cream had 10 gms per serving, as more date syrup was needed to offset the bitterness of the the concentrated powdered espresso powder.  There were 8 grams of carbs per serving from the date syrup, but less could be used if you don’t want as intense a coffee flavor as I did. There were 2 gms of carbs from the 1/2 of a dark chocolate bar that I pounded into chocolate “chips”.

 

The “Recipe”

The recipe to make Keto Ice Cream is more of a method, than a recipe. It can be used for any variety of keto ice cream flavors you or I can dream up.

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups (12 oz) heavy whipping cream

4 oz heavy whipping cream

1 – 3 Tbsp Silan (also called Date Syrup or Date Molasses – available at most Middle Eastern grocery stores)

Either:

(A) 2 Tbsp black sesame paste (available from a Japanese, Korean or some Chinese grocery stores)

OR

(B) 1 – 1.5 Tbsp powdered espresso powder 

& 45 gms of dark chocolate pounded into small “chips” 

Method

In a stand mixer or using a large bowl and a hand-mixer, whip the 1 1/2 cups of heavy whipping cream into soft peaks.*

* don’t over beat it, or it will become butter!

In a separate bowl, beat the 4 oz heavy whipping cream to soft peaks.

With a rubber spatula, gently fold in the flavoring you are using (in this case, either the black sesame paste or the espresso powder and chocolate chips). Fold gently, so as not to deflate the whipped cream.

Now gently fold the flavored whipped cream into the bowl of plain whipped cream, just until blended.

Pour the soft mixture into a freezer-safe, 1 quart / 1 litre glass container with a locking lid.

Freeze for 6 hours or overnight.

(For softer ice cream, stir mixture every hour and a half, scraping down the sides with a spatula and continue freezing).

Enjoy!


You can follow me at:

 https://twitter.com/joykiddieRD

  https://www.facebook.com/lchfRD/


 

Low Carb Green Tea Matcha Smoothie – role in weight and abdominal fat loss

This delicious low carb high fat Matcha Smoothie can help you lose weight & abdominal fat. The science behind it, the recipe & the nutritional info in this article.


Green tea is the unfermented leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant and contains a number of biologically active compounds called catechins of which epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) makes up ~ 30% of the solids in green tea [Kim et al]. Studies have found that green tea catechins, especially EGCG play a significant role in both weight loss and lower body fat composition.

Population studies and several randomized controlled studies (where one group is “treated” and the other group is not) have shown that waist circumference is smaller and levels of body fat is less the more green tea consumed   [Phung et al].  The anti-obesity effects of green tea are usually attributed to the presence of catechins [Naigle].

Several large-scale population studies have linked increased green tea consumption with significant reductions in metabolic syndrome – a cluster of clinical symptoms which include insulin resistance or hyperinsulinemia (high levels of circulating insulin), Type 2 Diabetes, hypertension or high blood pressurecardiovascular disease including coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis.

It is thought that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin in green tea, mimics the actions of insulin.  This has positive health implications for people with insulin resistance or Type 2 Diabetes [Kao et al]. 

EGCG also lowers blood pressure  almost as effectively as the ACE-inhibitor drug, Enalapril, having significant implications for people with hypertension (high blood pressure) and cardiovascular disease [Kim et al].

Research indicates that drinking 8-10 cups of green tea per day is enough to increase blood levels of EGCG into a measurably significant range [Kim et al]. 

The most effective way to reduce the symptoms associated with metabolic syndrome is through a low carb high healthy fat diet, however the addition of green tea as a beverage – especially as matcha green tea powder, may provide a means to preferentially target abdominal weight loss. 

GREEN TEA CATECHINS

Catechins make up ~ 30% of green tea’s dry weight (of which 60–80% are catechins) and oolong and black tea  (which are produced from partially fermented or completely fermented tea leaves) contains approximately half the catechin content of green tea.

Matcha, a powdered green tea used in the Japanese tea ceremony and popular in cold green tea beverages contains 137 times greater concentration of EGCG than China Green Tip tea (Mao Jian) [Weiss et al]. 

GREEN TEA CATECHIN CONTENT OF BREWED GREEN TEA VS MATCHA POWDER

A typical cup (250 ml) of brewed green tea contains 50–100 mg catechins and 30–40 mg caffeine, with the amount of tea leaves, water temperature and brewing time all affecting the green tea catechin content in each cup.

A gram (~1/3 tsp) of matcha powder contains 105 mg of catechins – of which 61 mg are EGCGs and contains 35 mg of caffeine. Most matcha drinks made at local tea and coffee houses are made and served cold and contain ~1 tsp of matcha powder which contains ~315 mg of catechins – of which ~183 mg are EGCs.   

WEIGHT LOSS EFFECT OF GREEN TEA CATECHINS

A 2009 meta-analysis (combining the data from all studies) of 11 green tea catechin studies found that subjects consuming between 270 to 1200 mg green tea catechins / day (1 – 4 tsp of matcha powder per day) lost an average of 1.31 kg (~ 3 lbs) over 12 weeks with no other dietary or activity changes [Hursel].

Body composition EFFECT OF GREEN TEA CATECHINS

The effect of green tea catechins on body composition is significant – even when the weight loss between “treated” and “untreated” groups is small (~5 lbs in 12 weeks).

Even with such small amounts of weight loss;

the total amount of abdominal fat decreased 25 times more with green tea catechin consumption than without it (−7.7 vs. −0.3%)

and

 total amount of subcutaneous abdominal fat (the fat just below the skin of the abdomen) decreases almost 8 times more with green tea catechin consumption than without it (−6.2 vs. 0.8%). 

HOW DO GREEN TEA CATECHINS WORK?

The mechanisms by which green tea catechins reduce body weight  and reduce the amount of total body fat and in particular reduce the amount of abdominal fat are still being investigated.  It is currently thought that green tea catechins;

–          increased thermogenesis; i.e. increased heat production which would result in increased energy expenditure (or calorie burning)

–          increase fat oxidation i.e. using body fat as energy. For those on a low fat high fat diet, this is good!

–          decrease appetite

–          down-regulation of enzymes involved in liver fat metabolism (fat storage)  

WARNING TO PREGNANT WOMEN

While EGCG has also been found to be similar in its effect to etoposide anddoxorubicin, a potent anti-cancer drug used in chemotherapy [Bandele et al], high intake of polyphenolic compounds during pregnancy is suspected to increase risk of neonatal leukemia. Bioflavonoid supplements (including green tea catechins) should not be used by pregnant women [Paolini et al].


Betterbydesign’s low carb Green Tea Matcha Smoothie Recipe

Total carbs: 2.5 gm per serving – contains ~315 mg catechins

Ingredients

1 tsp matcha (green tea) powder * (1 tsp = 2 gm)

12 cubes ice, crushed

1/2 cup (125 ml) coconut milk  

optional: 1/2 tsp Silan (Middle Eastern date syrup) – will add an additional 3.5 g carbs to the recipe

Method

  1. Place 1 tsp matcha powder in a small stainless steel sieve and gently press through the sieve into a small bowl with the back of a small spoon
  2. Put the sieved matcha powder into a ceramic or glass bowl (not metal, as the tannins in the tea will react and give the beverage and “off” metalic taste)
  3. With a bamboo whisk (available at Japanese and Korean grocery stores) or a plain spoon, whisk 3 Tbsp boiled and cooled water into the matcha powder, until all the lumps are gone and the mixture is smooth
  4. Place a whole tray of ice cubes (12) into a blender
  5. Pour matcha and water mixture over ice in the glass
  6. Pour coconut milk on top of ice and matcha
  7. Pulse until desired texture is achieved*

*I blend mine just fine enough to be able to drink it through a straw.

Enjoy!


Nutritional Information

Calories 91.48
Saturated Fat 7.7 gm
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 7.5 mg
Carbohydrates 1 gm
Dietary Fiber 770 mg
Protein 1.1 gm

Calcium 8.8 mg
Vitamin A (Retinol Equivalents) 198.4 mg
B-Carotene 1.2 gm
Magnesium 4.6 mg
Vitamin B1 .12 mg
Potassium 54 mg
Vitamin B2 .027 mg
Phosphorus 7.0 mg
Vitamin B6 .018 mg
Iron .34 mg
Vitamin C .12 mg
Sodium .12 mg
Vitamin E .562 mg
Zinc .126 mg
Vitamin K 58 mcg
Copper .012 mg

Polyphenols 200 mg
Caffeine 50 mg
Theophylline 0.84 mg


 https://twitter.com/joykiddieRD

  https://www.facebook.com/lchfRD/


References

Bandele, OJ, Osheroff, N. Epigallocatechin gallate, a major constituent of green tea, poisons human type II topoisomerases”.Chem Res Toxicol 21 (4): 936–43, April 2008.

Hursel R, Viechtbauer W, Westerterp-Plantenga MS. The effects of green tea on weight loss and weight maintenance: a meta-analysis. Int J Obes (Lond) 2009;33:956–61.

Kao YH, Chang MJ, Chen CL, Tea, Obesity, and Diabetes, Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 50 (2): 188–210, February 2006

Kim JA, Formoso G, Li Y, Potenza MA, Marasciulo FL, Montagnani M, Quon MJ., Epigallocatechin gallate, a green tea polyphenol, mediates NO-dependent vasodilation using signaling pathways in vascular endothelium requiring reactive oxygen species and Fyn, J Biol Chem. 2007 May 4;282(18):13736-45. Epub 2007 Mar 15.

Nagle DG, Ferreira D, Zhou YD. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG): chemical and biomedical perspective. Phytochemistry 2006;67:1849–55.

Park JH, Jin JY, Baek WK, Park SH, Sung HY, Kim YK, et al. Ambivalent role of gallated catechins in glucose tolerance in humans: a novel insight into nonabsorbable gallated catechin-derived inhibitors of glucose absorption. J Phyisiol Pharmacol 2009;60:101–9.

Phung OJ, Baker WL, Matthews LJ, Lanosa M, Thorne A, Coleman CI. Effect of green tea catechins with or without caffeine on anthropometric measures: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Clin Nutr 2010;91:73–81.

Paolini, M, Sapone, A, Valgimigli, L, “Avoidance of bioflavonoid supplements during pregnancy: a pathway to infant leukemia?”. Mutat Res 527 (1–2): 99–101. (Jun 2003)

Rains, TM, Agarwal S, Maki KC, “Antiobesity effects of green tea catechins; a mechanistic review” J or Nutr Biochem 22(2011):1-7

Weiss, DJ, Anderton CR, Determination of catechins in matcha green tea by micellar electrokinetic chromatography, Journal of Chromatography A, Vol 1011(1–2):173-180, September 2003

 

Spaghetti Zoodles with Bolognese Sauce

On a cool, rainy day, there is nothing quite as comforting as Spaghetti and Bolgnese Sauce, but who wants all those carbs? So I invented “Zoodles“; “noodles” made from zucchiniWell, I don’t think I exactly ‘invented them’ because I have since seen other people post articles about them, but they were innovative at the time.

Now that I’ve made these a few times, I actually prefer them to wheat-based noodles, because you can eat a large plateful and not feel overstuffed afterwards.  And when cooked just right, they actually can be wound up on a fork, just like pasta!

al dente Zoodles and Bolognese sauce

So how do I prepare Zoodles?

For two large servings, I take 2 or 3 slender, firm zucchini (less seeds this way) and shred them on a Japanese mandolin*, using the middle thickness of cross blade.

* I use the Benriner mandolin, but one of those "spiralizers" would work too, except it would be difficult to avoid shredding the pulpy middle.
shredded zucchini, ready to cook

I place the pile of raw “Zoodles” on a plate, sprinkle about 1 tsp. of water on top and cover with a microwave cover.  Then I microwave them at 80% power for 3 minutes, then let stand for 3 minutes. I drain the excess water by placing the cooked Zoodles in a colander and leave them covered until ready to serve.

cooked zucchini Zoodles, ready to top with sauce

Top with your favourite sauce and voila! Spaghetti Zoodles Bolognese – without the carbs!

Spaghetti Zoodles with Bolognese Sauce

Buon appetito!


You can follow me at:

 https://twitter.com/joykiddieRD

  https://www.facebook.com/lchfRD/